what i’ve been reading {summer 2013}

bittersweet shauna neiquist

{Bittersweet by Shauna Niequist}

This is a book of essays about a particularly difficult time in Shauna Niequist’s life, when she was dealing with a miscarriage and wanting to move and wanting to have another child.  There is lots of bitterness in the book, but she also has  a way of finding the holy moments in it all, and reminding us that sometimes the simple things like family around the table can help to heal us.  I love Shauna’s books because the essays are always so easy to read and yet also so thoughtful and deep. (And now I especially can’t wait to read Bread and Wine.)

walking on water madeleine l'engle

{Walking on Water by Madeleine L’Engle}

This is a treasure of a book.  It is about art, and how we are to be co-creators with God, and how as we grow older we forget to believe (hence the title, Walking on Water).  L’Engle wrote the book to try to answer the question of what Christian art or a Christian artist is.  There is no easy definition here (and I think trying to make an easy definition of it kind of defeats the purpose).  But her thoughts on the subject are so rich and she delves into so much more than just the subject of “Christian art.”  She writes about creativity and hard work; she writes about language and vocabulary and its importance in theology; she writes about how we create in order to create order, to create “cosmos from chaos.”  There is so much I underlined in this book, and so many lines I have copied down into a new journal I have started (a commonplace book–a collection of quotes) which this book inspired me to begin keeping.

The Invisible Girls Sarah Thebarge

{The Invisible Girls by Sarah Thebarge}

I don’t know where I found it, but I started following Sarah Thebarge’s blog just as she had started writing it several years ago.  I read it in the months following, as she told the stories of the Somali girls she had met and how she had helped them in their struggles to acclimate to a new life in American culture.  She stopped blogging about them when they moved away from where she lived in Portland to Seattle, so I was thrilled to hear that she was turning the story into a book.  The book goes into more detail about Thebarge’s personal life, about her fight against breast cancer in her twenties and about her growing up in a fundamentalist Christian household.  She wove her personal experiences into the story of “the invisible girls” and shows that not only did she become a salvation for the girls, but they saved her in many ways.

This was a quick read.  I borrowed it from my mother-in-law who said she had read it in one evening.  And while I borrowed it, most of the proceeds from book sales are going towards a college fund for the five Somali girls.

harry potter

{Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling}

I’ve been re-reading the Harry Potter books this summer for no other reason than that I haven’t read them since the last one came out.  It’s been fun going back and re-reading books that I sped through a bit more carefully and seeing some of the foreshadowing that J.K. Rowling so carefully plants.  What amazing stories.

One Response

  1. Mary August 30, 2013 at 3:33 pm |

    I haven’t run across the L’Engle book before, I need to check it out. Invisible Girls sounds like a good read as well! Thanks, Erin. I’m always up for book recommendations!

    Reply

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